DOWN TO EARTH SIMPLE LIVING FORUMS

DOWN TO EARTH SIMPLE LIVING FORUMS
I have a forum attached to my blog where people from all over the world meet to discuss simple life. There are about 7000 forum members now so we have an enormous amount of good information about growing food, cooking from scratch, family, simple living, routines, budgeting, baking and much more. Please click on the image above to go there. Newcomers will have to register. It's free, friendly and we're waiting for you.

13 July 2011

Sunny's Korean recipes

A couple of people commented and a few more emailed asking for Sunny's recipe for Korean BBQ beef, which is called Bul Go Gi.  Not only has she given me the recipe, she's remade the food and taken photos so it's easier for you to make it. Thanks for your help with this, Sunny. I send my love.

BUL GO GI
As with all Asian cooking, you do all your preparation and cutting first. 

Ingredients
  • 500g thin slice of beef (sirloin or tenderloin) 
  • 1 onion 
  • ½ carrot 
  • 5 dried shitake mushroom 
  • 1 spring onion (shallot)

Marinade Sauce
  • 30 ml soy sauce 30ml
  • 1½ tablespoons caster sugar 
  • 1½ tablespoons sesame oil 
  • ½ tablespoon sesame seed 
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper 
  • 1 pear 
  • 5 garlic cloves 
  • ½ onion




METHOD

1. Soak shitake mushrooms in warm water until soft.
2. Prepare and slice vegetables: slice onion and mushrooms, cut carrot julienne, cut shallot finger size.
3. Blend marinade sauce ingredients using blender.
4. Marinate beef in the sauce with sliced vegetables.

5. Put marinated beef in the fridge and leave for overnight (you can cook immediately but better if you leave overnight)
6. Heat the pan and add 2 table spoons oil.
7. Cook until beef has changed colour.
8. Serve in the plate on the table for everyone to help themselves.



Sunny's notes:
* It is usually served with rice in Korea.
* You can put more or less sauce as you like.
* You can buy sliced Bul Go Gi beef and shitake mushroom at Korean supermarket.
* You can use any kind of mushrooms (like button mushrooms).


JAB CHAE - noodles, beef and vegetables
Ingredients below are for one person - multiply by the number of people you're serving.
  • Glass noodles
  • 10 grams dried champignon mushroom (or any kind of mushroom)
  • ½ onion 
  • ½ carrot 
  • ¼ red capsicum (pepper)
  • ⅓ bunch asian spinach  or baby spinach
  • 50 grams beef (sirloin)
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil 
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seed 

Sauce 1
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce 
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar  
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper 
  • 2 cloves sliced garlic 

Sauce 2
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce 
  • a pinch black pepper 
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil 
  • 1 teaspoon crushed garlic 
  • 1 teaspoon sugar 





METHOD

1. Soak dried champignon mushroom and glass noodle in warm water until they are soft.
2. Slice onion, julienne carrot and cut beef into strips.
3. Marinate beef strips in the sauce 2 for 20mins.
4. Boil sauce 1 for 1minute and put aside.
5. Blanch spinach for 30 sec and drain water.
6. Heat the pan and add 1 tablespoon oil.
7. Saute vegetables, mushroom and beef separately and then put aside.
8. Saute drained noodle in the heated pan with 2 table spoon oil and boiled sauce 1 until noodle is soft.
9. Combine 5, 7 and 8 and mix with sesame oil and sesame seed (you can add more sauce 1)
10. Put on the serving plate.

Sunny cooked both these meals for Jamie's 100th day celebration so I can tell you they are delicious. If you've never tried to cook Korean food before, these would be good to start with. They're both fairly simple, and they're healthy and delicious. 

Just a note to those who've ordered goods from my shop: I'll be in touch with you tomorrow with details of postage and payments. I'm at the Neighbourhood Centre today. The baby's arrival has put me back a day. 

I hope you enjoy what you're doing today. No matter what it is, take 10 minutes for yourself to sit and relax. 

34 comments:

  1. I am allergic to sesame. What is the best alternative ingredient?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mjammie! That looks great. I bet it smells and tastes the same ;o)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Those recipes sound delicious. I love 'analysing' the different influences of Asian cuisine and how they overlap. I cook a fair bit of Indonesian cuisine which uses a sweet soy sauce, also as a marinade. I had Vietnamese the other day which was more like a hybrid between Thai food and Chinese. In any case, I should try this recipe - the hubby would love it! :)

    Blessings,
    This Good Life

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wow! That looks so good! Beautiful pictures!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Beef Bul Go Gi is one of my husband's favorite foods. I never thought to make it for him at home. This looks great!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Blue shed thinking, I'd just leave the seeds out but hopefully Sunny will read this later and make a comment for you. I'm not sure what would be a good replacement for sesame oil.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks to you and Sunny for this excellent bul go gi tutorial! Years ago I used to make this, but it's been so long I'd forgotten much of the process. We met the sweetest Korean ladies when DH was in military service, years ao. They taught me how to make several dishes, but over time I just gradually traded them for other new dishes. I'm going to enjoy making this again, thanks to you both!

    ReplyDelete
  8. My husband was in Korea in the early 70's and loved the food. He introduced me to it when we were married and I love it too. There is a great market near us where we go to get our Kim Chee and other foods. I will have to try her recipe, thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  9. as a (military) student of korean, i leanred to not only LOVE bul ko gi and all forms of kimchee, but the history and culture of korea as well! thank you for sharing these recipes and thank the chef for me as well...i have been looking for a good bul ko gi recipe for a while and would love to know her kimchee recipes as well...although i have learned a killer pak choy recipe and cabbage kimchee and white radish....ok enough.....can the chef share some kimchee recipes!

    i love your blog btw and am a first time commenter....i just love the bul ko gi recipe and couldn`t not comment...bad grammar...oh well...

    ReplyDelete
  10. Tell Sunny she rocks. She must be so busy and is so sweet to share. Yum. Can't wait to try these dishes.

    BStitches

    ReplyDelete
  11. THANK YOU SUNNY!! What a darling she is:) x

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thank you Sunny! I'm not adventurous when it comes to Asian cooking but I'm confident to give these a go as it's so straightforward.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thanks Rhonda and Sunny for some great new recipes to try :).

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thanks Rhonda and Sunny for some great new recipes to try :).

    ReplyDelete
  15. Both look absolutely DELICIOUS! Please Thank her for sharing these recipes.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Rhonda and Blue Shed Thinking,
    I'm no Korean cook (more asian/malay/thai) but I have tried Macadamia nut oil and it tastes quite similar to sesame oil maybe give that a go?
    Congrats Rhonda and Hanno on the youngest Mr Hetzel!!! I can't wait to meet him!
    X
    Jamie

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Jamie, thanks love. Good suggestion!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Thanks for posting this Rhonda - and thanks to Sunny for providing these recipes. I'm going to give these a go!

    One question: in the picture of the 2nd recipe, there are 2 ingredients that I don't think have been listed.

    One looks like red capsicum (at the 8 til 9 o'clock position on a clock) but I have no idea what the other one is at the bottom of the plate (say from 4 til 7 o'clock). Are these a different type of mushroom from the other mushies on the plate?

    thanks fleur

    ReplyDelete
  19. Oh thankyou so much Sunny for going to all that effort! Thankyou Rhonda for posting it, all I can say is YUM!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  20. Looks so good I wish I had some right now!:)Great step by step recipes, very well written should be simple enough to give it a try.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Fleur, I just checked the email that Sunny sent, there is red capsicum (pepper) in the prep list that I'll add to the post. The other ingredient is rehydrated mushrooms. Thanks for letting me know. I'll fix it now.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Looks so delicious...thanks to both of you for sharing!!
    Elizabeth

    ReplyDelete
  23. Blue Shed Thinking, I am not sure that this would take the place of sesame oil, but I use a lot of grapeseed oil, which has a subtle nutty flavor (for cooking anyway)...tho' sesame oil is way more intense in flavor. Sometimes, being we have lots of different food allergies in our family, I use other nut butters in place of things. When I make hummus for one person who is allergic to sesame and thus to tahini, I use either cashew nut butter, or a mix of that plus macadamea nut butter...and tho' it tastes different it tastes wonderful.
    Elizabeth

    ReplyDelete
  24. They look delicious Rhonda. Yum, some new recipes to try.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Kamsa hamnida, Sunny! I can't wait to try your recipes! They look yummy! My 11 year old dd is studying Korean, and I'm sure she and the rest of us will enjoy the Bulgogi. That is her favorite Korean dish.

    Linda in CA

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi mum. Everyone seems to like Bul Go Gi and Jab Chae recipes:-). Blue Shed Thinking, taste is good without sesame oil or seed. I've never tried before but macadamia nut(or grapeseed) oil would be a good replacement as little nite owl and Elizabeth suggested. I hope that everyone is gonna try and enjoy those Korean recipes:-).

    Sunny

    ReplyDelete
  27. Those sound delicious!! I'm pretty sure I'll try them both--and soon!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thanks for replying to my query. I use grape seed oil when olive oil would b too strong, so I can give that a go. Cashew nut butter wouldn't last long enough beyond breakfast to be a tahini substitute1


    My sesame allergy was the thing that set me on this path. I was having to avoid eating out, reading so many packages that it was simpler to cook at home from scratch. So however serious the problems it has caused me, the allergy also forced me to stop and think and change my whole outlook.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi Sunny! I'm so pleased you commented. : - ) Give Jamie big hugs from grandma please. See you soon.

    ReplyDelete
  30. It looks wonderful. Do you happen to know how to convert the grams and milligrams into US measurements?

    ReplyDelete
  31. THANK YOU!

    My husband and I used to attend a Korean church and were about to email the women who worked in the kitchen asking about recipes for BOTH of these dishes, which were always my favorite on Sunday afternoons.

    Thanks, Sunny!!! And congratulations on your adorable baby boy.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Hi,
    Thank you for sharing the recipes! I was wondering if the glass noodle dish is served hot, warm, room temperature, or cold. It looks delicious and I am going to make it later this week. Tell your DIL thank you for being so generous.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hi Sarah, I have had it hot and room temperature. Sunny said that at big events where food is served, it's often room temperature.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Bulgogi is translated literally as 'fire beef', but there are several kinds of Korean bbq'ed beef, so perhaps 'grilled thin slices of beef' would be a better translation.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for your comment today. I love reading your opinions and thoughts. We have built up a wonderfully diverse community here that I'm very proud to be a part of.

A link to your blog will be automatically added to your comment. Please don't add another link to your blog in your comment. Those comments will not be published.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...