Knitting and being inspired by other bloggers

20 January 2018
It's heart warming to see knitters around the world clicking away on their projects and taking a photo  or two so we can enjoy their work from so far afield.  In the past week, I've enjoyed Alicia at Posie get Cosy who always produces such fine work, Annette at My Rose Valley with her beautiful, soft crochet and I love what Tonya at Plain and Joyful Living says about how we choose to spend whatever money we have. It's a diverse and interesting group we have online and I am very thankful that these women, and many others, choose to share their lives and their craft work with us. I'm motivated to pick up my needles when I see their work and I admire the steady stream of garments they produce. I'm working on my annual gifts list so I'm knitting too although soon I'll try my hand at crochet, again.  


Currently I'm working on a shell pink jacket for a new born, the daughter of my editor on Down to Earth and The Simple Home books. I'm using Blue Sky Organic Cotton Worsted in 10 ply that has been sent to me by one of my sponsors, Salahan at Ecoyarns. It's chunky yarn, very soft, lovely to handle, easy to knit and it comes in a range of beautiful colours.  In the photo above I've just finished the collar of this top down jacket and will, later today, transfer onto long circular needles.  When you check the knitting links above, have a look at Salahan's blog as well. She is a spectacular knitter, she's based much closed to home in Canberra, and she's extremely generous with her knowledge. If you're looking for good quality yarn or needles, check out the Ecoyarns catalogue too.


This is a 5 ply organic cotton which I'm using to make a very soft face cloth.

My other knitting project is a very fine face cloth for an old friend, made with Japanese organic cotton that I've had on hand for a while.  I'll be using the same cotton to crochet around the top of a lamp skirt I'll start making next week.  The lamp skirt is for an old lamp shade I have here, it's not a gift, but I'm pleased to have made a good start on my gift list.  How are you going with yours?

If you're not a year-round knitter, now with summer (or winter) slipping by quickly, it's a good time to plan future projects and start collecting your patterns, yarn and needles. If you've already decided what you'll knit or crochet, I'd love to know what you have planned.

29 comments

  1. You've a very nice start on your knitting. I am a cancer patient. I took a skein of yarn and my needles with me to treatment last week. I soon had two different nurses inviting me to their knitting group that meets weekly. One also brought out her favorite needles to show to me. It's amazing how many people will talk to you if they see needles in your hands.

    I am taking radiation treatments as well as my second round of chemo. It's easier than the first with only one drug that is not giving me side effects. The doctor has declared me to be in remission, but there are still a lot of treatments which must be completed.

    God bless you,
    Laura Lane
    Carthage, Missouri, USA

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    1. Thank you Laura. I've seen how unifying knitting is too. Knitting in a public space is almost guaranteed to have you talking to strangers. It's a great way to connect with people. I wish you the best with the rest of your treatments.

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    2. Thank you Rhonda Jean. God bless you!

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  2. Thank you for sharing links about knitting. It is so much to see what other people are knitting and get idea and inspiration. I’d like to make a giftlist and start knit some gifts as well, I do have enough yarn for sure.

    I started knitting when my oldest son was about two years old, and he will be ten on tursday. I have knitted a lot to my children, but now I have three boys so there isn’t as much time for knitting as it used to be. But I very much enjoy the process of knitting, and I don’t mind picking up my needles to only do one roundnof two before something else calls for my attention. Right now I’m working on a woolen cardigan with a traditonal pattern for my three year old, and a couple of woolen hats with leaf pattern.

    I’d love to read or see pictures of more knitting :)

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  3. Can you recommend any videos or blogs good for genuine beginners for knitting and crocheting? I found a local class but have to work when they offer lessons and don’t have anyone in real life who can teach me.

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    1. Hello Bea. There are hundreds of how to knit videos on Youtube. Knitting is mainly just two stitches - plain and purl, and how to cast on and off. When you get into it, you'll add a couple of different ways to increase and decrease your stitches but you don't need to know them at the beginning. I like these two videos: https://www.thespruce.com/learn-to-knit-2116465 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esEtUaa-Pwg but if these don't suit you, just type in "learn to knit" and you can choose from the list. Good luck and let me know how you go.

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  4. Hi Rhonda, it's you who got me interested in knitting. I loved the dishcloth photos on your blog. I made the patterns in your book. They were very doable for a beginner. Right now I'm finishing up a cashmere hat and scarf for an Etsy customer. The yarn is soft, warm, and luxurious. I bought it locally. Thanks for the links.

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  5. I'm only knit in cotton here is in South East Queensland as we live in a sub-tropical climate and I found knitting in cotton so versatile in this climate. I am currently making some presents as well. Will check out Ecoyarns. I am very lucky to have a wonderful knitting shop not far from where I live with a wonderful array of wool, cotton and other fibres.

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  6. I learned to knit about 35 years ago from a lady at church. At that time we had a church auction every year. You offered items or skills to be auctioned the money went to different needs in the church. I bought 10 lessons from a dear older lady that became a dear friend. I made all kinds of items socks, sweaters, scarves etc. Then life changed, marriage of 35 years ended, moved to a new town, new job path, new friends and my knitting, quilting and crafts was put aside. That was 10 years ago. I retired at the beginning of this year, Reading your blog has started that need to get back to creating again. I dusted off my old knitting bag and dug out my yarn and started making dish clothes again. I have a good stock pile of yarn. When I was knitting if I found yarn I liked or a project I liked, I bought it and put it away for retirement knowing I wouldn’t have as much money after retirement. Thank you

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  7. I also decided to teach myself to knit after reading your first book, Rhonda. I made a scarf for my DIL for Christmas as they were in New York at the time. I also made one for myself as well as several dishcloths. I was going to try some doll clothes next. I inherited Mum's patterns. She was a prolific and very talented knitter but never taught me to knit. I have a lorry load of her wool, even though I gave another lorry load to our local knitting charity!

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    1. Well done, Diann. I think knitting is one of those simple life skills that not only adds to the productivity of the home but is also a very pleasurable way to exercise our creativity. I'm really pleased you've taken to it.

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  8. Hi Rhonda, Yes, I agree, its wonderful to visit around other blogs. I've been blogging for a few years now and always enjoy visiting, although I don't always comment (my computer is rather slow, rather painful so the process often prevents me leaving comments. Im both a knitter and a crocheter and do both throughout the year too. I may go and check out that yarn - nice to have more Aussie yarns available to us to use, especially good cotton ones!

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    1. Hello Sharmayne, thanks for commenting, especially as you're on a slow computer. I'll pop over later and visit you.

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  9. I've thought a lot about knitting face washers for gifts and last year I received one from a friend. It was such a lovely gift to receive.
    One thing I did find was that it was a bit small for me so I think i'll increase the size a bit to a standard face cloth or at least enough to cover my face. :-) Kate

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  10. I love seeing what other people are knitting and I wish I had time to get to a craft group (one day!). At the moment I am loving crochet and I've been making soap savers for gifts, they are so quick to whip up from cotton I got from the op shop.

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  11. Although I have been knitting since grade school (on two pencils during story time) I often need to look up a stitch or abbreviation. http://knitfreedom.com is very useful and she has free videos on YouTube. Her instructions are very clear and she takes it slowly so it is easy to see the stitch.

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  12. Can't knit but would love to learn. I am, however, sewing again and am in the middle of reorganising my sewing room. It feels great to clean it out, rearrange, get rid of stuff I no longer need and get reacquainted with what I have (sometimes buried in a bag). I have two projects lined up and just went to a local fabric shop for some spring and summer material. It is exciting and inspiring to start up sewing again.

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    1. Hello hopflower, you described it perfectly when you said
      "exciting and inspiring". I so agree with you. That is just how I feel when I see all the possibilities and then make a plan and start. I even get excited folding up my fabric bits and pieces!! Simple pleasures are the ones that make me the happiest. Cheers Jo

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  13. Good morning Rhonda, What a beautiful post. I too love looking at the pictures of what others are making. It is truly inspiring. I think I learned to knit as a 5 year old! Probably a ploy by my wonderful mother to keep me quiet and entertained on the 1 hour school bus ride home each night (many, many, many years ago and before I could read I suppose!) I think the story goes that I pulled out so much more than I ever knitted and, knowing me, probably never finished anything either BUT I learnt to knit and have done so for the last 60 years on and off. Knitting is very therapeutic and addictive....I think I have become addicted to knitting dishcloths! Making face cloths is a great idea - they would make very practical and personal gifts. Thanks again for all the time and work you put into your blog. We are all so very fortunate to have you as a friend. Cheers, Jo

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    1. That's a long and wonderful history as a knitter, Jo.

      I think of the people who comment here as friends too, yourself included. With each comment I build up my own personal understanding of them and over time, that develops into something deeper, like friendship.

      Happy knitting! 💗

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  14. I have been inspired by you to knit dishcloths and now have 5. I love the idea of face cloths. What kind of wool would be best for children's faces? My 5 year old daughter has sensitive skin. Thanks Nia x

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    1. Hi Nia. Knitting cotton is perfect for these cloths, both for dishes and faces. It can be thoroughly cleaned, hung out in the sun, and it dries much faster than wool. For a precious daughter with sensitive skin, look for organic cotton. That would give her the best cloth possible. Happy knitting. xx

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  15. Oh, thank you Rhonda! Am excited now, a new project, yippee Xx

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  16. O Rhonda.. still in the planning stage, I'd love to be creating Dish/ face Cloths & socks but apparently I'all fumble fingers! Any Ideas!?

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    1. None of this is fast, Leanne. If you're learning to knit, you have to practise to get better at it.

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  17. I'm really enjoying your series. I've been knitting washcloths for the last couple of years and now have way too many. So it's time to branch out. I'm moving to Minnesota for retirement in a couple of years, so I know knitting will be a hobby during the long, cold winters. (We bought our cabin this past summer on five acres on a beautiful river), so I'm hoping to spend a couple of months each year there before the actual retirement. I'm learning to knit slippers, and have already made a couple of scarves. Mittens and socks are on the to-do list, but I'm not that proficient yet! Thanks, Rhonda Jean, for the series and the encouragement to live the simple life.

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  18. Hi marypete, I found that KnitPicks.com has a great tutorial series for making mittens. It sounds like you're moving to the perfect place for a knitter!
    God bless your plans!
    Laura of Harvest Lane Cottage
    Southern Missouri USA

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  19. I am hopeless at finishing projects so i never tell people if i am making something for them lol. But I am planning on several scarves for me, my partner and son. I attempt a beanie every year but am yet to work out circular needles. I am also knitting some marsupial pouches for Wires who i am planning on joining later in the year. Cant wait to start helping some beautiful wombat babies or sugar gliders!

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    1. Hello Jacinta,
      Here's an easy video tutorial of the pattern I first used to make a beanie on circular needles. You may find it helpful, and it's free. Blessings from Harvest Lane Cottage,
      Laura Lane
      Carthage, Missouri, USA

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