DOWN TO EARTH SIMPLE LIVING FORUMS

DOWN TO EARTH SIMPLE LIVING FORUMS
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24 August 2016

How to cook

Most of the work I do here at home is food related with cooking, preserving, baking and growing all taking a good slice of my ordinary days. It doesn't feel like a chore to me because I enjoy it and I love the feeling I get when I cook nutritious family meals and when I offer home-baked goodies to visitors. I've read that many people don't cook now and the proliferation of cafes and takeaway food places in every small town and city is testament to that. It's seems very odd to me that adults who strive to possess every thing of value they can have don't see value in one of life's most important skills. And I'm saddened that boys and girls don't learn to cook either at home or at school.



When I go to my cupboard and choose a jar of jam, sauce, cordial or pickles, or place a home made meal on the table, I know what's in it. I know our food stockpile will see us through most family or community emergencies and that even if the worse were to happen, I could still provide food for my family and not go out to the shops to do it. It is the quiet knowledge of what we get from them that keep my patterns of work going year after year.

The days here follow patterns that regularly repeat themselves. Beds are slept in and made; when bread isn't baked, a quick circle of scones fills in; eggs, fruit and vegetables make their way from the garden to the kitchen to be eaten fresh or stored for later. Tea is made, meals cooked, menus planned. My food budget isn't stretched because these meals cost much less than their commercial, pre-prepared cousins. Systems are linked in a simple home and those systems support each other.


Fresh eggs from the backyard are turned into creamy custards that provide the nutrition we need to remain healthy. And the food cooked here is a reminder of our family heritage and culture and a constant comfort because of its familiarity. I can't imagine being cut off from that by not being able to cook.



At this point of my life, instead of working for a living, I work at providing a healthy framework in which to live. Every day a choice is made to keep to the rhythm of this domestic life; every day is the same and different. Working to provide a clean and organised home with good food on the table every day makes sense to me. The small, never-ending tasks that make up my days may look basic and mundane but the true significance of this type of work is evident in what it produces. And that, my friends, is a never-ending stream of good food and the easy self-confidence that comes from being able to produce it. I wish everyone knew how to cook but all we can do is to make sure the children in our own homes are taught to cook as they grow up. If we do that we're giving them comfort and pleasure, an ability to express culture, kindness and generosity, a way to celebrate important events and the potential to provide nourishment for themselves, family and friends that will last a life time. 

Do the children in your family know how to cook?

53 comments:

  1. Thank you for asking that question. We did teach our son to cook and let him potter in the kitchen. My son is 22 and has just finished Uni and is back at home again and working in his field. But while away at college he shopped bought all his own food, cooked and packed a lunch which saved him a lot of many. He still does pack his own lunch for work. Eating out is a huge money gobbler and is nice for special occasions but not on a regular bases.

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  2. When I was at school Rhonda ( 1970s) we were taken to " Manual" and the girls taught to cook and sew and the boys wood work and metal work. I am guessing that this is not longer an option in schools today. I homeschooled our 2 youngest so baking etc was included in their teaching and the older son that was not homeschooled also knows how to cook a meal. Our Son in Law told us that one of the things that attracted him to our daughter was the fact that she could cook and his work mates see the yummies in his lunch he takes to work. Our granddaughters being raised by the other grandparents are learning cooking at school. At home the other Nana does not cook from scratch or bake so I am pleased they are getting the teaching at school.

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    1. When I was in junior high in the mid 1990s, everyone took home economics and shop - boys and girls. I don't remember learning anything in home ec that I didn't already know, but I'm sure some students did. After 8th grade, those of us on the college track didn't have time to "waste" on those courses - I had to take physics instead. I'd have preferred advanced sewing instruction or knitting!

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  3. Rhonda you are magic with words. The first line of the last paragraph really spoke to me. Thank you.

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  4. I haven't really gone out of my way to teach my kids to cook, but I've observed they are learning my "osmosis" My youngest (9) loves to help in the kitchen, my middle child (11) loves to fry the sausages, but is known to get distracted while doing so, and my eldest (14) is doing food tech at high school, and is coming home and making the odd meal or baking. She was making something at school recently, and was moistening her hands so the ingredients they were forming into balls wouldn't stick to her hands, her friends were curious why she was doing it that way, as the teacher didn't say too...LOL...That's osmosis for you, she had watched me do it!

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  5. Hi Rhonda,
    My kids cook with me sometimes (it takes time and patience so I need to plan ahead!) My 3 year old can crack an egg into a bowl, chops vegetables, helps with measuring and pouring ingredients and stirring. I print out our easy favourite recipes with pictures for each ingredient.
    I'd also like to mention the fabulous Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program. My 5 year old's school started this a couple of years ago, they do vegetable gardening and cooking classes with the produce. I think it is such a wonderful thing, I wish the kindy students did it but they start in year 3. Come and check out the school garden next time you are in Blackheath! It is a sea of tomatoes in summer :)
    All the best,
    Peach

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  6. You know the happiest I have ever been as a mother is when I'm cooking the most for our little family. This last couple of months of renovating the kitchen has been so hard due to not being able to cook, to bake. Nothing makes me happier then to see the boys eyes when they realize there is home made, iced chocolate cake ready to greet them as a surprise afternoon tea when they come home from school! When guests come and the cake tin is full of something home made to eat. In fact after reading this post I am pre-heating the oven for a quick chocolate cake to cook ready for dessert tonight. I have college so will be home late, so this will sweeten the deal. ;)

    I loved this post Rhonda. Just what I needed today as we are re-establishing old routines.

    xx

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  7. Yes, mine know how to cook Rhonda. The youngest (13) needs a bit more in his repertoire to really be independent though. It's a skill I've always had and cannot imagine doing without. I love to eat and would be upset if I couldn't produce the food I wanted when I wanted it!

    As my oldest moves towards finishing school I'm realising that without good cooking skills things will be financially difficult for the children as they go off to uni/careers. So when I cook something simple and economical I always tell them 'here's a good thing to cook when you're a poor uni student'!

    I'm not sure if it's a phenomena that is occurring everywhere, but in my town there is a huge culture of teenagers going out to cafes and even out to dinner on a Saturday night. Most of them finance this with their part time job. On the one hand, it is a bit like being in Italy or Greece, off to a cafe on Saturday night to catch up with friends - and it's surely better than them wandering the streets getting up to mischief. On the other hand I worry that it sets up an expectation that adult life will be like this - out for a meal whenever they feel like it. When I think of the housing and living costs they will face it worries me. Does anyone else have kids in the 'cafe culture'?

    Madeleine.x

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    1. Hi Madeleine,
      My teens are not so much into 'cafe culture', but do spend their earnings on takeaway. McDonalds, Hungry Jacks and the like. We don't buy takeaway at home so I'm wondering if its just a novelty. Most of their friends don't have home cooked meals and this is what they eat all the time!

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  8. Fantastic post! You are inspiring. My kitchen is being renovated so my husband and I eat out more than I would like at the moment. I cannot wait to be back cooking all the time!!

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  9. Thanks, you are so sweet! Also,you are so right!

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  10. Yes, all my children now know how to cook and take their turn one night a week usually. Some just pump out a couple of signature dishes, some try something new each time, some excel at desserts and pastries and others excel at main meals. I excel at eating them!
    I have been thinking about the proliferation of cafe's etc too. I think we are manifesting a lifestyle of lofty privileged over achievers.....once upon a time very wealthy people employed staff to cook, clean, polish, garden, farm, manage the house - these capable folk were called servants (!). Nowadays modern society also have servants, the difference being we outsource them. They sew for us in China, they cook for us in thousands of different cafes and restaurants, they garden for us in market gardens across the whole world, they shop for us often shipping in the cheapest produce from distance lands, they manufacture many beautiful things for mere pennies by paying their employees slave wages. We kid our selves if we believe that slavery and indentured serfs and servants no longer exist - they are just hidden behind the glossy front of shops and websites....safely at arm's distance so we do not need to get seriously involved and can continue to buy up, eat up, super size up, trade up and step up.

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    1. Very interesting comment Mr Homemaker. I've thought about the faraway servants too, but notice there are also 'servants' nearby. Many, many people buy a coffee on the way to work (no prep, no washing up) and in the Summer there are mowing utes everywhere. It was unheard of when I was growing up to pay someone to mow your lawn. Many people also pay someone to wash their dogs and clean their homes. I guess it provides employment for someone but it does seem luxurious to me.

      Madeleine

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    2. Isn't it strange how (at least here) if I am a homemaker people sneer and make rude comments about being hanging around at home all day, yet, if I pay someone to come and do my housework and make my meals - it is called a job!! How ironic is that. Take care of someone elses home and it is considered work, take care of your own and people think you are lazy and don't have a job. A sad business. Pam in Norway

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    3. I like your analysis, Mr Homemaker - we do well to remember that it is people (not robots) who perform the "menial" tasks which keep Western society running the way many like it. However, there is a need for balance if we are not to deprive these people of their jobs - however badly paid they might be. I think it is incumbent on all of us to be wise with the way we spend our money - buying local where we can, but also lobbying companies which employ labour overseas to improve their standards and wages. We need to see that we can't expect cheap without cheapening someone else's life.

      This really is a global society - it has taken some time to get that way and it is impossible to make changes overnight. What we can do, however, is work at educating our own families to be more self sufficient so that there is more understanding of the value of the work people do. It is not enough to say that the world values work differently - obviously doctors should be paid more than the people who serve coffees, but we should appreciate the real value of what everyone does, and that starts in the home by learning to do the basic tasks ourselves. I learned to cook as a very small child, as did my brother. The next generation were let down horribly (in general) and it will take some time to bring all those household skills and the awareness of their value back.

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  11. Isn't it a great feeling when you derive enjoyment out of cooking from scratch. I have always enjoyed cooking although there have been times in my life when I saw it as a bit of a chore and sometimes that is almost been made a societal expectation. All the ads for fast food and packets of sauce mixes try and make us think that convenience will make us happy. To me happiness is making something that is better than shop bought and that at the end of the day I can reduce my time spent doing paid work. Now that I fully embrace cooking and the planning/ shopping and growing that is linked in with it I love the routine and sense of purpose. Once that all fell into place I learnt to think about how I could become more efficient and it is amazing how many things are just so simple to make and parts of one dish extend into another meal etc.

    I enjoy going out for a meal for a special occasion or on holidays away from home and I usually choose something that I probably wouldn't make at home. But going out to a pub or club for an often very average meal just because ..... no thank you.

    My children can both cook and one loves cooking for other people. The other is vegan and knows that cooking at home is much tastier and cheaper. His eating choices have challenged me but in a good way. I try and find new recipes if he is visiting and there is so much amazing stuff on the internet.

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  12. Since I've been home, recuperating these past 6 months, the routines of home (cooking, cleaning, mending, gardening, etc) have become even more dear to me. When I wasn't able to work, I truly missed the rhythm of my days. As days have gone by, I've gradually grown stronger and able to resume my ordinary life. What a precious gift it is!! I know that you embrace your life, too, Rhonda. That's one of the reasons I enjoy your posts so much. Thank you!

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    1. Pam, I'm so pleased to know you've recovered enough to do the work you want to do. I hope you continue to regain strength and enjoy getting reacquainted with your house work. xx

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  13. My 4 join me in the kitchen fairly regularly...My 8 year old daughter was triumphant in presenting her trifle for last night's dessert. They have all been allowed/encouraged to experiment from the time they could carry the big flour jar to the table and get a bowl from the cupboard. We coined the phrase 'pretend cooking' as my oldest (now 13, but probably 3 at the time) collected his ingredients, which often included a weetbix or two, strawberry milk powder, cinnamon and jam, and worked out how it would all go together with some butter, flour, eggs, etc. The tradition continues with my youngest who is now 5. From this process, they have learnt not just how to follow a recipe, but how to create one. They each have their own notebook with their successes recorded so they can re-create their inventions, sometimes with a photo taped in alongside the recipe.

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    1. That's wonderful, Meg, you're teaching self-reliance and I'm sure your children will be grateful for that in future years.

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  14. I am happy to say that all five of our children are really good cooks. I love going to their homes and eating meals they have prepared. They learned from their Mommy and Grammy that feeding people is one of the great pleasures in life.

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  15. My son is a marvelous cook. He always watched me cook and helped as he grew. However, the summer between high school and college, he opted to stay home and not work a summer job. As it was just the two of us and I was the worker bee, he bartered his decision into taking care of the "woman who worked" and have a clean house and food on the table every day.

    After the first week he was ready to jump ship, but the bargain was made and he had to fulfill it. Needless to say, he finally learned to read and follow a recipe, watched every cooking show he could, and really delved into cooking and baking. His Mango Chutney Chicken is to die for! Now, he is married and HE cooks for his family! So proud of him!

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  16. Hi Rhonda: My almost 6 yrs. old has been helping me in the kitchen since she was 3; she's very proud of what she makes and tells everyone at the dinner table what dishes are hers. Her 11 yr. old brother is another story. Maybe because he's a boy and everyone tells me boys are lazy but he can't make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich without making a horrific mess so, of course, I tell him I'll make it for him. Maybe he's a mix of lazy and shrewd. I keep telling him he should learn to cook because when he's older, out of college and on his own he'll have women chasing him because a man who can cook is a treasure. Any tips on how I can get his bum in gear to at least try?

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  17. My son can cook beautifully. His Father has always been the meal maker in this household and he taught the kids really well.
    My husband has been in hospital for a week and will be there for at least another 5 days. I have been cooking for my daughter and I, but have reached the limit of the meals I can cook easily and without too much thought. I believe it might be time for me to add a bit more to my recipe list for meals. The daughter can cook good meals but her work schedule sees her home quite late. As I'm not working I don't want her to have to turn around and cook a meal for her clueless mother.
    Yes my children and my husband can all cook really well. It's me letting the team down.

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  18. My 17 year old daughter is quite competent in the kitchen. She actually had a little baking business for a summer that was quite popular. She is less inclined for meal prep, but can do it regardless. My 13 year old son is a skilled baker; I often will assign him muffins or cookies or a cake for dessert. He is just starting to prepare his own meal-type food, but so far its not really his thing. I always tell them they both have to learn how to cook and prepare decent meals or they will be broke as an adult!

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  19. Beautifully said Rhonda and I couldn't agree with you more. And to me the important thing is that cooking need not be difficult or fancy. I think oftentimes people are afraid to jump into cooking because they're afraid it must be complicated or fancy to be done correctly. Delicious wholesome food can be provided to your family (oftentimes from your own garden or hens) and sometimes the simplest dishes are the most comforting.

    As always, I enjoy reading your words. Thanks for sharing!

    ~Taylor-Made Homestead~
    Texas

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  20. My children were always in the kitchen with me. My son insists that he could cook pikelets by two and my mother backs him up. I can't honestly say when being with mum morphed into being able. He is a chef now. My daughters are not so keen. My middle child has just turned vegan and now lives away from home. She cooks on a Sunday for her working week. I try ti have stuff for her but never get it right, My youngest can and sometimes does cook but she likes shortcuts. Her boyfriend is astonished that we don't have many packet mixes in the home as that is how his mum chooses to cook. Food allergies make it essential that I know how to cook for myself. But honestly as I have said it is a chore and not fun anymore.

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  21. I have read Down to Earth and own The Simple Life. I know you don't want to write another book, but a recipe book would be fantastic. All your favourites in one book. I plan and cook all our meals at home, although we do eat out sometimes. My kids are 6 and 3 and their favourite dinner is Spinach Slice, something that my Mum made when I was a kid. I have tried to teach my 6 year old to make it, but he is not interested yet. One day perhaps he will want to learn.

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    1. I second that idea! Maybe an e-book?

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  22. A lovely thoughtful post Rhonda. I am very passionate about cooking with kids and my 10 and 14 year olds are both great cooks and love it. In fact Mr 10 and I are about to make some meringues for dessert tonight! My 17 year old however has never been interested in cooking and informs me she will live on 2 minute noodles when she moves out! Sadly cooking seems to be a lost skill these days. I used to be a Kitchen Specialist in a school that had a Stephanie Alexander kitchen garden program. I loved cooking with the kids as most of the children had no concept of being in a kitchen, let alone cooking a meal or sitting down at a set table to enjoy the food. They were learning skills in the garden too, and then would harvest and cook the food they had helped grow. Unfortunately the school I worked for got a new principal who decided there was not enough funding to pay for me to keep my 2 days a week job, and that teaching cooking was a waste of time which could be spent focusing on literacy and numeracy. Now the kitchen which was built to teach children is leased out to community groups. This deeply saddens me.

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  23. I'm working on teaching my children to cook. My 7yo watched a knife-skills class with me online (bonus: totally counts as a home-ec elective for homeschool) and between that and my help she is now pretty confident cutting up fruits and veg with a small sharp knife. And my 3yo loves to crack eggs and help me stir things. And I've discovered that while my daughter is hit or miss on whether she enjoys cooking, my little guy just loves to soak it all in, asking endless questions about how things work and why/how we make foods the way we do--it's better to cook something more leisurely (like morning baking rather than dinner) with him, so I have time to answer his questions without getting frustrated because I'm in a rush.

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  24. My husband left home not knowing how to boil a potato, so I have tried to teach my four children a out cooning. My health doesn't allow me to cook as much from scratch as I would like to (I would like to cook only from scratch), but we seldom eat take-away and make most meals at home. My 13 year old boy particularly loves making dinner or baking something tasty. They all have a bit of cooking at school too. This Autumn I am going to teach the boys about making good soups from scratch. Pam in Norway (P.s. your beetroot looks delicious!!)

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  25. I'm happy that my kids 2,5 and 7 are learning to cook. They know the ingredients that make up their cakes, muffins and cookies. They can crack an egg better than my husband! They are developing skills like mixing, folding, whisking and flipping, all necessary skills. I trust them with knives and my eldest peels and cuts her own fruit, and prepares her sandwiches for school. As I write this I could actually go on. In their short lives, they've gained skills many adults don't have and that skill set will only increase as they get older, setting them up for life. Thank you for asking this question, Rhonda. Sometimes as a parent you forget how much you are teaching your children, tonight I've realised I'm doing alright in the 'life skills' department! Jade xx

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  26. My children are in their 30`s and all married. Both my boys do all the cooking as their wives don`t/can`t cook which I find a bit sad. My daughter is a wonderful cook and makes (and grows) almost everything that her family eats. I`m tremendously proud of my children but I feel a bit cheated that my daughters-in-law weren`t taught by their mothers to cook. And they have no interest in learning either!!:-(

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    1. It is a wonderful gift you have given your children! I often think that it takes all sorts to make the world go around and maybe your sons and thier wives have found a good team/balance in each other. I don't know whether your sons would prefer thier wives to help out as I don't know the full story but if it is the case that they are all happy with the arrangement then maybe thier wives are giving to the family unit in other valuable ways. All the best to you and your family :)

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  27. Lovely to read, at first I thought your round of scones was soda bread. Do you have a good recipe for beetroot? Ones I've tried before are always too sweet.

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    1. It's okay to cut the sugar down in these vinegar recipes. The vinegar will preserve the food. So just add the amount of sugar you prefer or none at all.

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    2. Hi Rhonda!
      I've always been a home cook and have always enjoyed growing ,preserving as much as possible...my husband doesn't cook at all...but our 5 adult sons are all good cooks...our youngest , aged 24 was home recently and it warmed my heart when he said "Mom I REALLY miss your cooking....After his visit, he asked me to send my recipe for meatballs....He will make a great husband someday, I think!!!
      I loved to cook and bake and the sons were always in the kitchen with me when they were young ,which yes, made for much bigger messes but I guess they learned, too...
      One more thought...at every meal, their father always said..."guys this is the best meal EVER."...we never had fussy eaters...

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  28. "It is the quiet knowledge of what we get from them that keep my patterns of work going year after year."
    This is powerful. Thank you for this post!
    My 3yr old boy loves to help in the kitchen! As soon as he could help at all with anything, I let him. Littles can do so much more than we sometimes give them credit for. It was challenging at first because it was oh so messy and took MUCH longer, but now...he begs to help and is quite skilled...at only age 3. Of course, we will soon have little brother joining us (he is 8mos). They learn more than cooking (math, patience, cooperation, following directions, etc).
    This post was a timely reminder for me, reminding me of some of the reasons why I do what I do every day.
    Sarah from New Mexico

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    1. My sons could make their own (uncooked) breakfasts from 4 years of age. They could boil eggs and make toast at 6. Jamie is the same as your son, Sarah. He makes a mess but now at 5 he's starting to be more careful and tidy. Keep up the good work, love, what you're doing is important.

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  29. Your writing always encourages me to love working at home more than I already do! Thank you!

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  30. Love this post and yes my girls cook in the kitchen with me. There is just something so comforting about a home cooked meal. Thank you for sharing, I just love your blog!

    Blessings,
    Jill

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  31. Our younger son is a very good cook, and an even better baker. He even made his own wedding cake. Our daughter in law can make a meal, if it is necessary, but she gladly leaves all the cooking to our son, who loves it. Our elder son learned the basics at home, but when he went to university, he had no kitchen available, and later he worked such long hours that he didn´t have time to cook. So I am afraid he really forgot how to do it. But now, with a new job and a girlfriend who likes cooking, I hope he will remember what he learned at home with me!

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  32. It's sad to see our society descending into dependency upon the industrial food complex for pre-prepared, poor-tasting and non-nutritious food. And this great post shows, it's sad to see something as basic to family life as home-meals disappearing. People who never learned to cook don't buy fresh produce, so the effect is felt by farmers like us who depend upon direct market sales. Having said all that, I'm hopeful that we're in the midst of a change back to food that is healthy, delicious and home-cooked. Thanks for waving the flag and being an inspiration to people. :)

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  33. Love this post Rhonda! My three are 11, 9 and 4. The eldest is a great cook - she can loves baking and desserts, anything from making lemon curd to layer cakes, muffins and pancakes. She has also moved onto main meals (yay!) including ravioli (from scratch - pasta dough plus filling), kofta, risotto. The second is learning, he loves helping to bake and with supervision can make brownies, banana bread, prep veggies for dinner. The littlest loves rolling pasta, switching on the food processor, cracking the eggs, etc. When the elder two were little I baked with them as an activity, I needed snacks for them anyway and figured it was more useful for me than playdough... So they have always seen and been in the kitchen. Consequently they love eating, too! With Maia (11) I have even outsourced "bring a plate" requests when we are going to dinner somewhere. Bonus!
    Great comments from everyone, these competent kids give us all hope for the future.
    Ally

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  34. My three year old is an avid cook already! It makes my heart glow when she says "let's cook mama"...even if that is often her way if getting cupcakes!

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  35. Yes! I have a very informal 'curriculum for life' in mind every day that I spend at home with my kids before they go off to primary school. One of the 'subjects' is cooking and together we routinely cook the foods that sustain us... my 4 year old chops all manner of vegetables and meats with a sharp steak knife and my 6 year old has graduated to being able to use the stove and oven where it is safe to do so. Obviously, i am present and watching at all times as they are participating in potentially dangerous tasks however they have been taught knife skills and safety in the kitchen from the very early days so the risks aren't as bad as they may seem.
    I just think it is so crucial for children to see these life sustaining and enhancing skills as normal. Although it is fun and rewarding, i don't want the kids to see washing clothes, washing up, tidying, cooking, or mending as a game but rather as normal tasks....I worry that if it is too much of a game that they will tire of it (which they may many times throughout life! i have!) and think 'its not fun so why play anymore?'. Rhonda and the community here....you continually inspire me and keep me excited and motivated about these kinds of things! Thank you!!!!

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  36. For me, it is important that my son and daughter learn how to cook, clean (wash clothes), mow the lawns, etc. Mr 3 helps me cook sometimes, he also helps with washing clothes and dishes. When Miss 5mths is older, she too will learn such things. I grew up with separated parents and I quite often had to mow the lawn, I want my children to learn all sorts of skills!

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  37. I've taught my kids to cook from the age of three. My 7 year old can now cook full breakfast, cookies and basic meals like spaghetti bolognese. And my 10 year old can choose, plan, shop, cook and present a meal as well as I can. It has been one of the great joys of my life to pas on my love of cooking and food to my children. They pack their own lunchboxes everyday and understand the benefits of eating healthy and from scratch.

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  38. I have just found your blog today and I am going to spend a lot of happy reading time here. We have 3 girls aged 2, 5 and 6. They all love to cook and at least one of them helps me in the kitchen every single day. The older two can pick what they need from the garden and make a salad with very little instruction as well as make scrambled eggs, pancakes, baking and lots more. We also have a veggie garden and some fruit trees that they help in on a daily basis, whether it be picking, watering, fertilising or just admiring alongside me. We still have a lot to learn and I'm so grateful my own mother instilled a love for all things gardening, cooking and 'simple' in me. My kids love and appreciate growing their own food and I'm really excited to have found another source to continue our education (along with hours spent with my mum in her garden and kitchen).

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  39. Hello Rhonda. It gives me great pleasure to know my grown daughters know how to cook for their families and do it well. But the greatest pleasure of all is having my little 4 year old granddaughter cooking with me as well. Cooking will not become a lost art as long as we take the time and effort to teach our young ones. It is so rewarding and happy

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  40. "...instead of working for a living, I work at providing a healthy framework in which to live"
    What a fantastic turn of phrase Rhonda. I will likely quote you in future, I have copied these words into my private notebook. I never know how to describe what it is I do for a living but now I do, thank you.

    Alana

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