28 February 2013

Working at home


During the week a wonderful comment came in on the post about Kevin's Man Made Home. It was from rabidlittlehippy. I started writing a long response but then thought it was too long and I should make a post of it. The comment follows:

I'm a stay at home mum to 3 kids 4 and under and life can be very challenging sometimes. I've also battled with depression for most of my life and ante natal and post natal depression with my older 2 kids. I only share this for context. Since falling pregnant with my youngest who is now 18 months old I have finally found my niche. I am a homemaker and budding homesteader. Greening up our lives, making do, mending and doing without as well as "damning the man" by making at home as much as I possibly can (this is a learning curve and work in progress but we are getting there) and avoiding supermarkets wherever possible has become my life. We moved in December last year to our new home on 1/2 acre in rural Victoria and I realised on Sunday that I am actually happy. :) Not every moment is cotton wool and fluffy bunnies but the satisfaction I gain from baking my own sourdough bread, growing fruit and veggies (not much harvested this season but we've learned a lot) and I'm even learning to take satisfaction and pleasure from the most mundane and despised of tasks. There is incredible satisfaction in getting my overwhelmingly large pile of clean washing folded and put away or clearing the kitchen, even if it's just stacking the dirty dishes neatly. As much as I enjoyed my work before I had kids I am not planning to return any time soon as I thoroughly enjoy my slower life. I just hope we can one day be in a position that my husband can stay home with us whilst the kids are still young enough that we can all be happy together. :)

rabid, I sometimes go through a range of emotions when I read the comments people leave here. When I read your comment it was joy, and from "sunday" onwards, I smiled all the way to the end. I brought it over here so everyone can read it. Sometimes when I talk about happiness, I think many readers believe I'm smiling all through the day or that I have the most wonderful home life, or even that my expectation of happiness is so high, I trip over it.  But you know EXACTLY what I'm talking about. What you've described above is what I feel.



It's a feeling of low simmering contentment and fleeting happiness throughout the day. And it's brought about by the daily tasks I carry out every day. You're right, it's not all cotton wool and bunnies, it's satisfaction, self-reliance and doing the ordinary work of a simplified life that makes it so. When you go about housework by rushing through it, you don't feel this. The slowness of our days seems to magnify it, and makes it tangible.

Pure wool from my wonderful sponsor, Eco Yarns. Their new website is looking great.

Happiness is rarely one big thing, it's a hundred small fragments that come together to make what we feel. Those hundred things can be the tasks we carry almost every day, what we see around us, what we learn or simply knowing that our life is what we make it. Many others look at this life and shake their head in disbelief that anyone would want to make bread when you can buy it, or knit, or be made happy by folding clothes and stacking dishes. What they are seeing is the physical work carried out, but they don't understand that doing those things - knowing how to do them, having the time for them and being content to give that time brings about a level of satisfaction not much else can match. I'm sure there'll be readers wondering what I'm going on about just by writing that sentence. But you and I know. And that's enough.


This way of living gives you a real purpose. You feel that purpose when you know your house work is important and you know that by doing it you help make your home more sustainable. You take control of your domestic tasks, make menu plans, stockpile, work to a routine and a budget, you work with a purpose and to a plan. And during the day, while you're doing all the tasks that bring a family together by providing good food, clean clothes and comfy beds, happiness is always lurking. It's there for all of us, not just the mothers who stay at home; this is not tied to gender, marital status, or whether you live with two cats or ten children. It's there for all of us who work in our homes and love it.

52 comments:

  1. Hi Rhonda, I'm glad you re-posted this comment because I didn't read it the first time around. It's all so true and such a perfect time for me to be reading this. I've just come out of a crazily busy month and can't wait to spend some days at home. I love nothing more than being home and baking, cooking and preparing the house so that life feels good when the kids come home tired from school. I enjoyed this post and will keep these thoughts as I go through my day too!

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  2. This post is so perfect and exactly what I needed today. I am working full-time right now but am planning to quit the end of June to become a full-time homemaker. I am looking forward to it so much. Reading this post and seeing how others gain so much happiness from the work they do at home is inspiring. I cannot wait until I can fully understand what you have written. Thank you.

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  3. I feel like she took the words right out of my mouth! What a joy to find a little space on the Internet where everyone is so like minded.

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  4. HI Rhonda, I totally agree with you when you say that happiness is made up of small moments, and not the big things! I've always thought this and it's great to hear you say it too! I work from home 3 days a week doing office work, and usually hubs and I have lunch and morning tea under our pergola, just talking about our day, listening to the birds and appreciating how lucky we are. I am contemplating finishing paid work at the end of 2014 when I will just about be turning 60 so I can access my super. My accountant says that our finances are 'not overly generous' for long term planning but I am confident we'll be fine. I am so happy that I have embraced the frugal lifestyle which will enable me to leave work when I want to and which enables me now to work 4 days per week (and still save!). I find encouragement from reading your blog each day and other frugal lifestyle blogs as well. Gotta love the good side of the internet!
    Judy xx

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  5. I've always felt a sense of satisfaction on completing the laundry, even when I'm fully aware within a week it will all be back again. I love a clean and organized house. Although, it hasn't been quite the way I like it since the birth of my daughter over 4 years ago. I chose to stay at home when she was born, after almost 20 years of teaching. But I feel what I'm doing at home it the most important work for me right now. It isn't for everyone, but it fits me. I'm working on trying to simplify our life and be more frugal. Rhonda, I find your blog very inspirational. It has become very helpful on my journey. Rabidlittlehippy, I admire your honesty and perseverance. I suffered from debilitating post-partum depression after the birth of my daughter. I now have great admiration and sympathy for those who suffer life long depression. I'm thrilled you are finding satisfaction and happiness in your life. It is often the simple moments that bring me joy these days. Gazing at my daughters peaceful sleeping face, watching the snow fall outside our front window and sipping a cup of tea with fresh laundry folded next to me. Both of you enjoy your day.

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  6. Forgot to include my name in my anonymous comment. My name is Theresa from wintry Royal Oak, Michigan, USA.

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  7. Both posts made me stop and THINK .... and yes, it is right:

    "It's a feeling of low simmering contentment and fleeting happiness throughout the day. And it's brought about by the daily tasks I carry out every day. You're right, it's not all cotton wool and bunnies, it's satisfaction, self-reliance and doing the ordinary work of a simplified life that makes it so. When you go about housework by rushing through it, you don't feel this. The slowness of our days seems to magnify it, and makes it tangible."

    Spot on .. both of you!!

    ENJOY THIS WONDERFUL DAY. :)

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  8. Wonderful words from you both..... you have certainly summed up the joy that comes from each of our uniquely simple lifestyles. Personally, my "simmering contentment" comes from me being in control of my life rather than it controlling me...... and that's priceless!

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  9. lovely post again Rhonda. Even more wonderful is that this lady has found contentment early in life.Long may her joy continue.
    Love Angela (south England) UK

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  10. Yes, yes and yes. It is slow simmering contentment. It's that super feel good moment when the lunch you pack your child/husband is all homemade a it just feels so much better than a sandwich made from bought bread and a packaged muesli bar.
    The busy days (the ones where you have to be out and running around) aren't anywhere near as lovely as the ones spent working like a Trojan at home.

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  11. Such a true comment from rabid. I wish there was a way to share the soulful experience of living simply and working in your home with friends. I am 26 and have just stopped working full time as a teacher (a job I really enjoy) to have our first child (due in a week or so). Already I have stopped thinking about work and am loving the quiet moments of domesticity. If only others would believe us that this way of living allows us to reach our full creative potential as humans"

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    1. I hope the birth goes smoothly for you and your baby. What an exciting time for you. Let us know when the baby is born.

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  12. Hi Rhonda,
    Simmering contentment is exactly right, I like the sound of that. Most times I bubble & boil with happiness but other times I tend to cool down a little too much, usually when I look at the washing/folding/putting away piles!, ie: 49 pairs of undies, 70 socks to match up, and 56 t-shirts, shorts,skirts etc, then there is pj's, bras, linens..! :) Its about finding the balance and keeping it simmering really isn't it!! Happy to be a homemaker :)
    xo

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  13. A fantastic post and reposted comment - now l am smiling - l'm not alone with my thoughts, there are more of us! Norway is one of the worlds richest nations...but not one of the happiest. Society is all about money and posessions - nowonder people loose sight of what happiness is when all life is about is empty values such as working inorder to increase consumption! Only in blogland have l found people with similar thoughts and values as myself - in "real" life l know noone. We are working hard at learning to live simpler and more self contained, reducing posessions and making more of our own food, clothes etc. More time together as a family and making do, repairing etc. Thanks so very much for sharing, Pam x

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  14. Exactly! Beautiful post and sums up entirely how I feel too. It took me 2 years to make the adjustment after leaving the workforce and having babies (including post-natal depression) but, now I'm here, I'll never go back.

    Sara

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  15. This was a perfect time for me to read this post. Things have been super busy lately and will remain that way till the end of May. I can't wait for summer to come and have things slow down some. BTW, I love your blog. Keep up the great work .

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  16. Wow, I am feeling very humbled that my little comment has received so much attention. Thank you. And thanks to those who have popped over to visit my little blog too. :)
    You've hit it on the head again Rhonda. It's not ear to ear beaming all day long. There are some days I feel like a grumpy bear, constantly growling at my kids and moaning about all I have to do. Some days nothing gets achieved and I feel frustrated at the end of the day and other days I find myself manic in my happiness (your post has sent me up into the clouds with ear to ear smile) but behind the extreme moments of moods is the warmth and comfort of being content. I wouldn't trade a minute of my crazy days of domestic bliss/chaos and everything that goes with homemaking and being a SAHM for a 9 to 5-er job with a paycheck, no matter how big the paycheck might be. And I am elated to find that there are so many others out there who feel the same.

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    1. I'm so pleased you came to read here today, rabid. I thought about emailing you but I wanted you to be surprised.

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    2. When I noticed my stats had jumped from 10 reads per hour to 68 I knew something was up and the only 2 other times that's happened it has involved your blog too (Weekend Reading) so you were my first guess, quickly confirmed with your readers leaving comments and mentioning where they were from. Thank you for the absolutely wonderful surprise. I had woken at 4:30 after a nightmare and when I sat down to read my emails at just after 5 I felt a LOT better. You have really made my day. Thank you again.

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  17. This comment, and your reply, are spot-on. I, too, have found something of an "antidote" to personal issues since deciding to be more positive about my life at home. I have found that taking charge of the way we live, being proud of the everyday tasks I accomplish, being committed to frugality, making as many things as I can from scratch...living this way makes me feel good.

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  18. Oh how wonderful to find contentment. I only work part time but enjoy it. I am happy to be home. Wednesday is my day home by myself. Yesterday worked in veg patch, well chooks helped me I let them clear part of one patch they were very happy. Picked beans, tomatoes, snow peas and our first corn, and eggs of course. Had a beetroot sandwich for lunch my pickled beetroot and made my first plum and apple jam. I was on top of the world had a great day. My hubby is slowly getting it. Gave him a bought tomato the other day, he said it was terrible, I said this is why!!. Di

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  19. Loved this post Rhonda,
    Peeople always seem to think that everything needs to be good and wonderful, in order to be happy.
    But I agree that happiness is found in smaller pleasures, often adding up to a feeling of contentness.
    On an unrelated note, last night for the first night in a long time I went to bed at about 8.30pm
    Usually I am up until at least 12.
    What a wonderful surprise to wake up completely refreshed and energised at 5am!
    I'm starting to see why you get up so early.
    It's a beautiful time of the morning to be up, when they day is still new.
    Hope everyone stays safe and content today, sending all my love,
    Bec.

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  20. "Simmering contentments". Yes, exactly! And it's the little things that bring us joy, throughout our day.
    :o)

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  21. Good for you, Rabid! What an excellent post. I keep thinking that what Rhonda and the rest of us have kind of "stumbled upon" (if that is the right word) is a very Eastern notion of finding spiritual enlightenment through being present. I don't think this philosophy is at odds with other religions, by the way. But the fundamental peace - the "simmering contentment" - many of us experience through the seemingly mundane tasks of keeping home really is "nirvana" right here on earth.

    Cheers,
    Kate in NY

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  22. Beautiful post. Like many others, the longer I stay at home the more contentment I am finding in my life, and with the simple things. So much so I am dreading having to return Financially I need to go back part-time for us to survive. Plus that way my partner can work less. But in my dream land I could stay at home forever and fill my time being with my children, sewing, baking and gardening.

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  23. What a lovely post, My swin teacher work was cancelled this morning and I'm not worried about the little bit of money loss, but have just made a cake and about to give the oven a clean out, jobs I was struggling to fit in this week. So grateful for the gift of extra time, it's priceless!

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  24. After reading the above posts I'm struck by the thought that all of you have a wonderful trait in common-gratitude.
    Finding satisfaction , joy and contentment by appreciating the important things, family, good healthy food , friends, work that is productive, creative and useful.
    Some days cultivating gratitude is harder than others. I'm sure we all have days when we could scream if we find another wet towel discarded on the bathroom floor or muddy bootprints on our just cleaned floors ( I'm the only female at my place!) but taking some time to read here about what other homemakers are going through I find very reassuring and inspiring.

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  25. I just want to put a few words in here for those of us who still have to work to pay off that mortgage before we can retire! I garden and cook from scratch over the weekends, and do as much as I can to make our lives simple and enjoyable. I can still get those lovely moments of quiet happiness while I am home-making in between my work times. I think the important thing is to look for simplicity and happiness, and you will find it. I love what you write Rhonda and am not knocking it, but don't believe in putting off that happiness until I can give up work.

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    1. africanaussie, we all experience the happiness and contentment our homes hold in different ways and at different times. There is no way you could put off experiencing happiness if it is there for you. I'm not saying this is only for people who work in their homes full time. It's there for all homemakers, no matter how much time you spend there.

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  26. Truer words never spoken, ladies. We are a privileged lot, us homemakers. I think it must be very hard for people in the paid workforce to be able to slow down enough to experience with gratitude the peace and satisfaction that comes from home-choring.

    Rabidlittlehippy, you are blessed to have discovered, at your young age, the truth of "behind the extreme moments of moods is the warmth and comfort of being content". Hope you can stay on top of the depression.

    And this post is meant for me today. I'm making myself clean windows - not my favourite job. Now I'll try to find pleasure in doing a good job as I DO love looking through clean windows!

    Lyn in Northern New South Wales.

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  27. I love my life of being a "housewife." I just wish others would understand that it's not a dull life, but one of great satisfaction. I was cringing when I watched the show "Living with the Amish" (which I loved by the way), as there was a particular young female who was just figuring herself out, (as you do at that age), but she just didn't get it that the female Amish could be satisfied with their lives. To her, it was a life of drudgery and oppression, but for the Amish I think it's quite free. They know which jobs they have to do everyday and they are very happy with that. I feel like we've come full circle, had a taste of what modern life offers, and we can pick and choose what we'd rather do for ourselves.

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  28. First time commenter here - usually I'm a lurker! I loved this post..... contentment is what I want to achieve. I'm in the planning stages of living this way more than I already do (making lists of what I want from life etc), but I work 30 hrs a week, partly from home and partly in an office and I already never seem to get everything done. My housework is very behind, time for family and other things is lacking. I guess what I want to know is, is it an urealistic expectation to think that my house will be lovely and clean (no more dusty blinds!), fresh bread will be baked daily, quality time spent with all family members and time to tend a verdant green vegetable garden? I don't want to set myself up with unrealistic expectations, but I do have things that MUST be accomplished each day such as cooking, cleaning and family time, on top of my work commitments. I feel overwhelmed already and that is definitely not the way to feel content. How do I do I take the step of the busy treadmill when I am already so busy with life? Leiani. Perth, Western Australia

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    1. Leiani, if you could see my house at the moment... There is probably toddler breakfast on the floor, dirty dishes and piles of unpacked boxes. It's a journey and like all journeys it's made up of many steps. I am learning to be a housewife that keeps house, not just lives in it and it's taking me time to get there. Bread baking is something I thoroughly enjoy but the thing I love most is the ease of using a no-knead recipe. I use sourdough but yeast breads can be made the same way. Google no-knead bread and you should find heaps to help.

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    2. Hi Leiani
      As someone who understands what it is like to have multiple demands on my time - I am a full-time working single mother of 2 under 6 years old, with my mortgage and vegetable beds, and I bake bread every 2-3 days- I find that if I focus on just the task I am doing at that moment, rather than the other things I am not doing instead, or what I should be doing next or what I didn't get done yesterday, I find small contentments. Even with my schedule, I try to squeeze in regular meditation as this has helped tremendously in letting go of the endless thoughts which make you think you are busier than you actually are, and which lead you away from simplicity.
      It works for me.
      Good luck. Kali

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    3. Leiani, and yet you have time to browse the internet. I do not intend to sound harsh or judgemental with that statement. The point I am trying to make is that we all make decisions about how we spend our time. I'm guessing internet time for you is your down time - a way for you to relax and a wise decision. One of the other decisions you can make is that when you clean, use the very simple recipes for homemade cleaners here on the blog - that will save you money and reduce the number of chemicals in your home. Make your bed every day. Use the five minute bread recipe on my side bar once a week to make bread. Grow herbs from seeds or seedlings in a few pots just outside the back door. Start tracking your spending and then go on to make up a budget. Make a realistic list every day of three things you want/need to do the following day, things like "iron for 15 minutes, tidy the door shelves in the fridge, write a menu plan" - and do them. Stop buying disposables. On your days off, take 15 minutes for yourself and sit outside with a cup of coffee. Sew on a button or fix a hem. But more than that, never expect anything to be perfect and stop pressuring yourself. You don't have to plan to live simply, you just do it with any/all of the things I've just listed. And you don't have to do everything I'm doing or anyone else is doing, just do what you can and then you won't "be in the planning stages" you'll be doing it.

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    4. Many thanks Rabidlittlehippy and Kali for relating the realities of your lives and experiences. I guess I need to let go of the perfection illusion and enjoy what I have and do!!! Rhonda, thank you for your words. Yes, internet is my down time whilst I eat my breakfast or sip a coffee, looking for insiration too. You are correct about so many things especially the decisions I make - do you read minds?! Reading your suggestions, I already do some of them and now realise I should congratulate myself on achieving those and not focus on what I don't yet get to do. Sometimes it takes perspective from someone else for it to make sense. I will plan to add some of the ideas from yourself and the others, one thing at a time. I like the easy bread recipes and growing some herbs/veg in small pots on the patio. Wish me luck and contentment. Again, thanks all. Leiani

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  29. Hi Rhonda, I'm not sure if my comment got sent to you 1st time around when I hit the publish button.
    The post by both of you is a brilliant one. Honest and raw as the day is long. May we all be remembered for our gentle acts of kindness in the day to day of daily chores, home making and building loving relationships with our family and friends. As our little cousin said on Sunday when his Gran died. "Who will butter my crackers now........" It is the little things in life that make the biggest impact. Enjoy creating your day. Jude sunflowersandtulips

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  30. This is what it's all about.
    This is the good life, with all it's ups and downs, it really is the good life.
    Blessings Gail

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  31. Hi everyone,

    It's so refreshing to find others who get so much satisfaction out of housework. I have just moved from Sydney, Australia to San Francisco with my husband for his work. Consequently, I had to quit my job to take on the role of an "IT Wife", at least for a few months while my work visa is processed. At first I was apprehensive about no longer contributing financially, but just over 1 month into being a homemaker, I am feeling a sense of duty: The duty to turn our new apartment into a home where my husband and I can relax and unwind.

    I am still in my 20s. Being so career-oriented, I never thought I would become a "housewife", but I have no issues with it. My friends back in Australia ask how I fill my days at home. I knit, sew, cook, do the housework, explore the city and work on my sewing blog. It's really a wonderful time of my life.

    Rin (An Aussie now living in San Francisco)

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  32. Rhonda, and Rabid (!) I'm new to your blog(s) and am just relishing the read. A sometime sufferer I feel I'm now approaching calmer waters ...yes, I too love that expression 'simmering contentment'. I need to work on loving my housework, as I really don't - or not a lot of it, but I love to cook, make bread, sew, so perhaps I am heading in the right direction after all this time!

    Thank you for a fresh approach to living life.

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  33. Hi Rhonda and Rabid, I am single in my late 40s and at the moment I work outside the home full time but I long for my evenings,weekend and holidays where I knit,sew, grow vegies and cook from scratch.I have set myself a goal financially so that I can work less outside the home within the next 10 years and your blog and your approach to life is helping me to do that. Thank you

    Antoinette

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  34. Rabidlittlehippy and Rhonda - what a great post. It made me smile and confirmed I am on the right track in my own living and that there is support from many others through this blog who are doing similar or the same things :-)
    A friend of mine from USA sent me an article titled the "Price of Progress" and it outlined the price we have paid to live in today's fast paced society. The author spoke of her great great grandmother who lived what we would deem as a harsh existence but this is what was written about her " She never wisdhed for newer things,nicer clothes or a more modern house.Like the Quakers around her Ann accepted life as it was, gratefully received small blessings as they came, and remained REMARKABLY HAPPY AND TRANQUIL!!!!" And therein lies the truth :-)
    My food processor packed up and I was tempted to go and get another one and then I remembered how much today's throw away society irks me and really did I think I was above cutting and grating veg for a salad or using my hand held electric beater to make a cake and then I received my peace back once more.
    Now I am off to bottle peaches :-)
    Karen NZ

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  35. PS - has anyone else noticed how their reading material has changed as your lifestyle has? Mine is now books like Down-to Earth, $21 grocery Challenge, Pigs Tits and Parsley Sauce,Living off the smell of an Oily Rag and many of living a more sustainable life plus gardening books.
    Karen NZ

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  36. I know what you are feeling also. I spent the last two years in such a depression that I was ready to divorce my husband in order to find some happiness! As 2012 rolled into 2013 I made a conscious choice to make my own happiness and not blame or depend on Hubby for my happiness.
    This past week I was snowed in at our home and was forced to slow my life down and just enjoy what nature was gifting us. They were the most wonderful and wonder-filled couple of days I have had in a very long time.
    I will continue the morning tea in front of the fireplace and the evening tea in front of the fireplace, as well as spending weekends just making a home for Hubby and I. :-)

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  37. I loved this post Rhonda and Rabid. Over Xmas I had 3 weeks off work and I made a concerted effort to live simply. I stayed home (I only went away for one night)and got stuck into the garden, housework, bottling harvested fruits, and basically just enjoying each and every moment I spent at home. Now I am back at work and the peacefulness, satisfaction and sheer joy I experienced in those 3 weeks are but a distant memory. I am lucky that in a coupe of months my work hours will be reduced and I am not going to look for anymore work. Instead I am going to use my time getting back those feelings I previously experienced a couple of months ago. Yes I am worried about the financials but know that the feelings I will experience will far outweigh the reduced income.

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    1. I had chills reading this post by Rae as I thought I must have written it under a pseudonym! Over the summer holidays I also had 3 weeks off and went away only one weekend. I preserved, grew, baked, cleaned, and lived. In 4 months my contract is expiring and I am also not looking for new work. I am going to just reduce our cost of living way down to the single parent pension for the one year that I can get it and start living again. Since I experienced my 3 weeks of bliss I cannot shake it and I feel alienated and nauseous with my office life.
      Kali

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  38. Great post. I have been unwell for several months. Require huge amounts of rest. I have found much joy in being able to tend the smallest of household details. Getting the bed made, running the roomba to get dirt off the floor. starting the dish washer.
    Knowing that I can do these small things gives me pleasure. Knowing that it makes a difference gives me joy.

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  39. Rhonda & everyone else who has contributed, I loved this post and the more posts I read I begin to finally realise that being a SAHM is worthwhile and my feelings of 'not being a financial contributer' are dissappearing as I realise that being a homemaker and living more frugally IS contributing to our financial situation by saving us money and therefore saving my partner's paid working time. I have finally started to realise that the jobs I do at home ARE worthwhile and am becoming less resentful of the constant build up of washing and cleaning and cooking for 4 children and a partner, and seeing the joys in these simple tasks rather than the chore of it all. I have reinvigorated my vegie garden and have involved the children in the planting and caring and harvesting which has been so fulfilling and soothing to my soul. I have really started to let go of trying to be 'perfect' and and just slowing down, stepping back and looking at the bigger picture and then realising that my partner and the little people in my life are the most important things in my life and caring and nurturing them is an incredibly worthwhile and important job! I also have accepted that life is a work in progress and it takes lots of little steps, and its really the journey not the destination that matters the most! And i intend to enjoy and savour it! Thanks for your inspiration and encouragement.
    Julie-Anne xx

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  40. Rhonda,
    my mouth is watering at the sight of that bread. :) Would you share your recipe? Have a lovely day,
    Kristin

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    1. Kristin, the recipe is in Five minute bread in Rhonda's Recipes in my side bar. I used rye flour for this loaf.

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  41. This is such a wonderful blog and I'm so happy to have run across it. I found you from a link over at slowlivingessentials.blogspot.com . There are so many people who don't get this. It's refreshing to find someone who does place value on being a homemaker. I love it, embrace it, and if I'm ever blessed to be able to not have to work outside the home I will. I've always worked less than full time, just enough to supplement our income. I made taking care of home, family, and homeschooling our daughter a priority. Our daughter graduated last year, but I'm still making being a homemaker the main focus of my life. I'm a nurse as well and through the years met those that said they wished they could live like I do. I never spoke up much as I'd never want to make anyone feel bad, but I think more people can than they think possible. It's about making choices in our lives. I've never been rich and never will be, but consider the time I've spent with my family more valuable than money.

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